Summer Wildflowers

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Summer Wildflowers, 26 x 41cm, mixed media on board

Lately, I have been deciding on the colours I want to use first before painting, and have been loving the results. Limiting my palette has had a very freeing effect on my work, allowing me to solely concentrate on what I am creating and not on what colours I’m going to be using as well. I’ve used a lot of water too which has dictated the shapes and patterns I have used as it flows and moves my paint into its own desired shapes.

I’m going to be exploring this method of painting more, not just because I like the paintings I am producing, but also because I am really enjoying myself.

Summer Wildflowers, along with In the Blue, Dancing and Swaying, and a few other wee paintings will be exhibited at Smithy Gallery in their Affordable Art Show from 24 June – 22 July 2018. The Private View is on Sunday 24 June, 2pm–5pm. You are more than welcome.

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Spring Woodland

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Spring Woodland, pastel on board

I have just managed to work out how to sell my paintings with variations on Etsy. It took me a while.

You can now buy Spring Woodland as either framed or unframed, depending on what you want. I can now head into the weekend with a real feeling of achievement – a database didn’t defeat me!

 

Allium Meadow, Work in Progress 1

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Just a quick sketch so I know where I want things to be. I also like working on board that is heading towards the darker shades.
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And now a scramble to get as much colour down as I can, covering the board (bits are allowed to shine through, though).

Into the Woods, chalk pastel landscape 4

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Finished, Into the Woods, chalk pastel on board. I couldn’t get rid of Little Red Riding Hood, but she isn’t so easy to spot now. The painting is now mounted and for sale on Etsy.

Painting Outside in Korea

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Temple Doors, South Korea, chalk pastel on board

Sketching or painting outside can be a very relaxing experience, but it all depends on where you decide to plant yourself.

Until recently, I lived in South Korea and I used to love painting in Gyeongju, Korea’s ancient capital.

On this occasion spring was at it’s height and I had completely misjudged the crowds after a harsh winter which were out walking or taking photographs (both national pastimes).  Even though it was early in the morning, the only westerner with an easel and chalk pastels was fair game.  I was jostled, photographed (as was my work – a big no-no without permission) and I have Korean fingerprints on my painting as pastels had not been seen before.  I have never been the centre of so much attention – it’s rather difficult working with a camera lens resting on your shoulder.

My advice?  Be careful where and when you choose to set up for en plein air painting, but be very grateful to the temple’s monks who go out of their way to feed and befriend you with a life time’s supply of coffee and boiled sweets.